Arts & Entertainment

May 14, 2019

The many dimensions of Marvin Oliver

Oliver is the recipient of the 2019 Odegaard Award.


May 13, 2019

In Lynn we trust

Director Lynn Shelton's new film, "Sword of Trust," will open this year's Seattle International Film Festival.


March 29, 2019

‘Citizen Jean’

A new book about Seattle is an engaging history lesson for newcomers to the region and a juicy replay for old timers.


March 12, 2019

A tip of the toque is in order

Renee Erickson, ’95, is short-listed for Outstanding Chef at 2019 James Beard Awards.


March 5, 2019

Welcome to Noir Town

Greg Olson, film curator at the Seattle Art Museum, has been lurking in the shadows of the city's cinema scene for decades.


March 1, 2019

Master of the tearjerker

Tearjerkers and epic female-driven novels have earned Kristin Hannah, '83, an international following.


December 13, 2018

Hoaxes, humbug and lies

An interview about race and identity with poet and scholar Kevin Young.


December 8, 2018

how to be a partisan, alice gosti, choreographer gosti, italy gosti, alice gosti choreographer, uw school of dance

The language of dance

Contorting the imagination with choreographer Alice Gosti, ’08.


November 30, 2018

Gratefully remastered

A 1974 concert at Hec Ed Pavilion, long a favorite of Dead Heads, is one of six historic concerts being released in a beautiful new boxed set,


Myles Gaskin, ncaa football, gaskin, myles, running back myles gaskin, nfl running back, uw husky running back, pac 12, gaskin football, myles football, washington football, husky, huskies, quinn russell brown, quinn brown

The great Gaskin

How a kid from Lynnwood became the best running back in Husky history.


August 29, 2018

Career puppeteer

If these puppets could talk, they would describe Aurora Valentinetti as the UW's beloved puppeteer.


August 24, 2018

Rehashing Husky history

We chop it up with pop culture critic Chuck Klosterman.


July 2, 2018

Books: Understanding PTSD—and how to help

June is not just for marking the end of the school year and welcoming good weather. It is also PTSD Awareness Month. This month, the PTSD Foundation of America launched a nationwide awareness campaign to shed more light on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and the impact it has on veterans—and their families. With more than 20...


Meet the beetles

Biology professor Jim Kenagy takes in the surprising beauty of ordinary life in wild places.


June 22, 2018

Art, identity on display at KEXP

Four Huskies presented the rawness of struggle and survival at the UWAA Short Talks on Art.


May 24, 2018

Meet the artist: Miha Sarani

The painter behind our June 2018 cover is a UW master's student.


April 5, 2018

Jamming through Japan

Jazz drummer Adam "Von" Baron, '97, is headed to Japan to tour his latest albums.


March 3, 2018

claire dederer

Perfectly Claire

Best-selling feminist author Claire Dederer, ’93, on growing up grunge, creating a literary canon for the Northwest, and bad men who create great art.


October 19, 2017

Painting labor

Arely Morales, '17, took inspiration from Latino artists and a poet in developing her style.


September 27, 2017

Life-changing documents

A quirky and thought-provoking new book from an iSchool professor.


Family fare

Screenwriter Temple Mathews teams up with his daughter to produce a romantic comedy for all ages.


September 20, 2017

no apparent distress

Books: UW pediatrics resident pens compelling coming-of-age memoir

“No Apparent Distress” by Rachel Pearson is a terrifying, compelling and excellent book about the American health care system.


September 14, 2017

Drama king

Tim Bond, '83, returns to the School of Drama as a professor.


September 7, 2017

paul bannick, quinn russell brown

Birdman

“We’re in the ideal spot for owls,” says Paul Bannick, a wildlife photographer who climbs trees and hikes tundra to capture images of the nocturnal predator.


August 18, 2017

Audobon honors

Heather Roskelley, ’83, made a magical image of a notoriously elusive bird.


July 17, 2017

Robert Osborne (1932-2017)

Remembering our famous host of Turner Classic Movies.


Age on your own terms

Anyone who is planning to get old should read this book.


March 3, 2017

Sol Moravia-Rosenberg, Sol, rap Seattle, UW poetry

Rhymes on the mic

Rooted in a rich legacy of rhymes, a new class of poets compose verses that channel their cultures and challenge the status quo.


March 2, 2017

‘Twin Peaks’ redux

Anchored by its UW star, “Twin Peaks&Rdquo; is coming back to the airwaves on May 21.


February 28, 2017

Emily Cabaniss

Libretti librarian

Emily Bolton Cabaniss, ’14, is the librarian for the Seattle Opera, one of only three opera companies in the entire U.S. to have their own librarian.


desert cathedral, Travis Gutierrez Senger

Reel success

Powered by a double degree in creative writing and drama from the UW, Travis Gutierrez Senger scored a breakthrough with his 2016 film, “Desert Cathedral."


A one-inch autograph

A high school essay by Bruce Lee is one of the earliest examples of his handwriting.


February 27, 2017

kathy hsieh

Dramatic dynamics

Stereotypes don't have a chance when Kathy Hsieh, '87, takes center stage.


January 26, 2017

Gregg Henry, Scandal, Hollis Doyle, ABC

Doing the Donald

Character actor Gregg Henry, '75, channels President Trump on ABC's "Scandal."


January 19, 2017

Drawing (for) a crowd

UW art professor David Brody is teaching the world to draw.


December 19, 2016

betty macdonald, paula becker, uw

From Betsy to Betty

Dropping out of college may be the best thing Betty MacDonald ever did. The irreverent author called it quits after studying design and drawing for one year at UW. A new book explores her outlandish life.


December 16, 2016

Up Close

A new exhibit surveying the work of Chuck Close, ’62, runs through April 2 at the Henry Art Gallery.


werner herzog, eric ames

Feel the Wern

Cinema professor Eric Ames, '93, is our guide through the mysterious mind of filmmaker Werner Herzog.


June 1, 2016

Nordic Noir

Scandinavian Studies Professor Andy Nestingen shares his research into the genre and how it contrasts with American Noir’s heroes and villains.


March 1, 2016

War is sexy. Huh?

David Shields, author, essayist and UW English professor, takes the New York Times to task in his book, "War Is Beautiful."


KEXP rocks its new digs

KEXP and its predecessor KCMU have been a staple of the Seattle music community for four decades. With new digs at the Seattle Center and a 30-year cooperative agreement with the UW, the station enters its next phase as an independent nonprofit.


September 1, 2015

25 years of dance

The UW's unique master's program influences dance education across the country.


UW Press at 100

The University of Washington's press dates back to Edmond Meany's 1915 book on the governors of the state and territory.


March 1, 2015

‘I am art'’

“I am not a painter or a sculptor or a glass artist. I am art.” Anyone familiar with the work of American Indian Studies professor Marvin Oliver understands that this is not an egotistical statement, but a reflection of a vision that embraces an astonishing range of materials, styles and techniques.


Second act

Ron Simons is having one hell of a second act and he’s got three Tonys, a Drama Desk Award for Best Play, a Drama League Award, and even a prize for best documentary to prove it.


December 1, 2014

Film buff

Cinema Books owner Stephanie Ogle reintroduces classics, champions new treasures and plays a starring role in celebrating film.


September 1, 2014

Prey for the senses

Ann Hamilton delves again into the world of animal-human relationships in her upcoming show at the Henry Art Gallery.


Book store lifer

Louise Little is a University Book Store icon. She started 34 years ago as a cashier and is now CEO. But it all started when she read Nancy Drew as a kid.


March 1, 2014

'Silence is a coping mechanism'

Teresa Tamura captures poignant stories of hardship from a World War II relocation center in her book "Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp."


Conquering Everest

The first time I tried to climb Mount Everest was in the spring of 1987. It was a very different mountain then from the swarmed-over scene it’s become today.


December 1, 2013

Platinum grad

For Ryan Lewis, ’09, the whirlwind of fame is only a few years removed from days ensconced in Suzzallo Library and the Parnassus cafe in the basement of the Art Building.


Montana mindscape

Ivan Doig's tales of the West have made him one of America's top authors.


September 1, 2013

The inspiration inquiry

Expanding the boundaries of knowledge in dance, theater and other performing arts requires research of a different stripe.


December 1, 2012

Drama king

Since he graduated from the UW in 1976, most of Ruben Van Kempen's days—and plenty of his nights—have been spent as the Director of Theatre at Roosevelt High School in Seattle. He recently earned a spot in the Educational Theatre Association’s National Hall of Fame.


September 1, 2012

Passion for nature

In their new book, nature artist Tony Angell and UW professor of wildlife science John Marzluff disabuse the notion that the family of birds known as corvids—crows, jays, magpies—possess mere “bird brains.”


Dawgs on the dial

Beginning this fall, Husky fans will be able to catch every UW football and men’s basketball game on TV, thanks to the Pac-12 Networks, an innovative partnership with FOX and ESPN.


June 1, 2012

Football and film

From winning a Rose Bowl to an Oscar for documentary filmmaking, being a team player is the secret to success for Ed Cunningham, ’91.


March 1, 2012

'Arts den mother'

It’s easy to feel like Nancy Guppy, ’82, is a personal friend even if you have never met her.


September 1, 2011

Common Book

To commemorate the University of Washington’s 150 years of discovery and inquiry, the 2011-12 Common Book is The Meaning of It All: Thoughts of a Citizen-Scientist by Richard Feynman.


June 1, 2011

Screen time

Temple Mathews, ’76, describes himself as someone who never shies away from a challenge. He credits this attitude for getting him to Hollywood.


Uncloaked

Books such as "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" are part of a crime novel tradition dating back to at least 1965 in Scandinavia—a tradition Andrew Nestingen, associate professor of Scandinavian Studies, has followed for years.


Maestro steps aside

Matt Krashan, the UW’s maestro of music, dance and more, will retire in September from his position as director of the UW World Series, a program that is recognized nationally for its excellence and innovation in the performing arts.


March 1, 2011

The pedagogy of gaming

The growing suspicion that video games are culturally and artistically relevant is attracting attention from an unlikely source—the academic world.


The business of gaming

If you still think video games are for teens in the rec room, it might be time for a closer look at what’s become the biggest entertainment phenomenon since television.


The science of gaming

UW faculty, students and alumni are using computer-game technology to solve some of humankind's most vexing problems.


December 1, 2010

Market man

Ben Franz-Knight, '96, is executive director of the Pike Place Market Preservation & Development Authority, the organization that oversees the 103-year-old Seattle institution.


Special collection

The Henry Art Gallery, UW Libraries and UW Press are teaming up to bring the beauty of the Seattle Camera Club to the public.


'What Work Is'

“What Work Is” was featured in the 2010 UW Common Book, You Are Never Where You Are. Since 2006 the UW has chosen one book for all freshmen to read.


September 1, 2010

Hot in Hollywood

Standing 6 foot 4, Joel McHale is a tall man in Hollywood. And now, he’s a big man in Tinseltown.


June 1, 2010

Stage to screen

Lynn Shelton, ’87, parlayed a UW degree in drama into a 10-year career on the stages of New York. But she found her true calling when she opted to pursue a career behind a camera.


March 1, 2010

Hard-hitting alumni

What comes to mind when you think of the Rat City Rollergirls? If it’s tattooed women and fast, physical action, you’re not alone. But that’s not the whole story.


Visual flair

Two reasons why the Emmy Award-winning TV series 'Mad Men' is so highly acclaimed are its visual style and historical authenticity. Assistant costume designer Allison Leach has had a big hand in both.


September 1, 2009

Books of revelation


March 1, 2009

Haunted hallways

When Kevin Rupprecht, '06, accepted the job of principal at Forks High School, he didn't realize he was signing on to be a minor celebrity as well.


Just call her a scholar

Ellen Dissanayake is working in a field she invented: evolutionary aesthetics, the study of art-making as an innate human behavior that helps us survive.


Evolution of art

Ellen Dissanayake came up with a paradigm-changing theory: Art-making evolved as a behavior that contained advantages for human survival-and those advantages went far beyond what Charles Darwin ever imagined.


The healing arts

Last fall, the UW School of Medicine and the Henry Art Gallery teamed up to offer a new course to help medical students develop their diagnostic skills by visiting art museums.


March 1, 2008

One popular geek

Call it “Revenge of the Nerd.” Rainn Wilson was, by his own admission, a hopeless misfit in high school. But when he made a recent appearance at a Kane Hall event, the adoring undergrads had to be turned away by the hundreds.


December 1, 2007

Comedy mind

For comedian and 1996 alumnus Drake Witham, the road to success has been a long, bumpy and filled with detours.


UW ceramic arts program is in good hands with Patti Warashina

The UW’s ceramic arts program is ranked among the top five in the nation. Ceramic artist Patti Warashina, ’62, ’64, is one of the reasons why. She taught at the UW for 25 years before retiring early to take care of her husband and fellow ceramicist Bob Sperry, who was dying of cancer. Warashina’s own...


December 1, 2006

100 books by Huskies

To celebrate the literary achievements of our UW community, the editors of Columns asked 15 faculty, alumni and book publishing professionals to help choose 100 outstanding books by 100 UW authors.


The black TV book

Kathleen Fearn-Banks once worked in TV, and now has written the dictionary on an important part of its history.


Book report

For a long time we’ve wanted to celebrate the creative power of the University of Washington by presenting 100 top books by 100 UW authors. While the idea sounds great on paper, coming up with the final list was no easy task. What follows is an editor’s diary of the selection process. 


Changing the game

Ward Serrill found his passion in the form of a documentary called "The Heart of the Game," a film that chronicles seven years with the Roosevelt High School girls’ basketball team and its unconventional coach. Film Critic Roger Ebert called it “a triumph.”


June 1, 2006

‘Common book’

“Mountains Beyond Mountains” was named the UW's first-ever "common book." Every member of the incoming freshman class will be reading the book this summer, and thinking, talking and writing about it this fall.


March 1, 2006

The mountain mover

From the Vietnam Veterans Memorial to her new topographical installations at the Henry, Maya Lin has permanently altered the landscape—and the way we look at it.


September 1, 2005

High-tech art

When the UW’s Center for Digital Arts and Experimental Media (DXARTS) started four years ago, it set the standard for digital arts education and became the envy of other institutions around the world.


June 1, 2005

Dream weaver

From Lever House to the White House, from Fallingwater to the Louvre, Jack Lenor Larsen’s fabrics have graced the world’s most inspiring spaces.


Magic carpet

When Meany Hall opened its doors in 1996, there was plenty of drama in the lobby as well as on stage. The carpet was extraordinarily beautiful.


March 1, 2005

Scene change

Can graduates of the UW’s prestigious acting program find fulfillment away from the footlights? Four PATP alumni share their stories.


June 1, 2004

Role of a lifetime

This spring, Jim Caviezel hit the big time playing Jesus Christ in Mel Gibson’s controversial movie The Passion of the Christ.


Idol in the making

Matt Rogers, ’01, first tasted the limelight when he played on the Husky football team that won the 2001 Rose Bowl. This year, he reveled in more adulation as a finalist on the TV show American Idol.


March 1, 2004

Dancing the classics

The UW has one of the only dance programs that re-create modern dance classics — despite roadblocks from choreographers and problems documenting each step.


December 1, 2003

Author's inspiration

Michele Torrey, '88, was having trouble finding books for her three teen-age sons. She decided to fix that problem by writing one herself.


June 1, 2003

Rag to riches

From ragtime ditties to grand opera, alumnus of the year William Bolcom has mixed pop tunes with classical music to become one of America's greatest living composers.


March 1, 2003

Peg Phillips, 1918-2002

Peg Phillips, a retired accountant who took acting classes at the University of Washington at age 65 and went on to have a career that lasted nearly two decades, died Nov. 8. She was 84.


June 1, 2002

Star stuntwoman

Jumping out of helicopters, driving speeding cars and fighting bad guys is all in a day’s work for Marla Casey, ’86.


Reversal of fortune

For more and more workers, the American Dream is just a mirage, say the authors of a new book.


March 1, 2002

Making it work

He transformed an obscure theater group into a legend; he nurtured three Pulitzer Prize-winning plays; he may even masquerade as a female playwright—but drama professor Jon Jory insists it's all in a day's work.


Athlete and actor

Herman Brix’s storybook account of growing up in the lumber camps of Washington to become an Olympic athlete and major movie star is the subject of Mike Chapman’s 2001 book "Please Don’t Call Me Tarzan."