Arts & Entertainment

December 4, 2021

Stepping up

Dance students and faculty once again get a chance to strut their stuff.


Imogen exposed

Imogen Cunningham was an innovative and influential fine art photographer. A retrospective features nearly 200 of her works.


The art of curiosity

As she curates an exhibit at the Jacob Lawrence Gallery, doctoral student Brittney Frantece examines art through a critical lens.


The midcentury view

A new book finally shines a spotlight on Paul Hayden Kirk, ’37, who set the standard for Northwest modernist architecture.


Portraits of justice

Alfredo Arreguin has painted the official portraits for three justices on the Washington State Supreme Court. At 86, the master of Mexican-American art remains a source of colorful ideas and vivid canvases.


November 19, 2021

From pain to poetry

Poet Jane Wong isn’t afraid to lay her emotions bare as she explores ways beyond the written page to reach audiences.


September 11, 2021

Art and exploration

“Fly Your Own Thing,” a celebration of the late Alden Mason, ’42, ’47, is on exhibit at the Bellevue Arts Museum.


Ballet in the Cold War

The Cold War played out on exotic battlegrounds. Perhaps none were stranger—and had more unexpected outcomes—than cultural-exchange ballet tours.


September 8, 2021

Visual music

Through the interplay of light with her creations, artist Barbara Earl Thomas creates ‘ordinary magic.’ Her extraordinary work explores childhood, race and religion.


September 4, 2021

The Nisei story

‘Boys in the Boat’ author Daniel James Brown’s new book depicts the heroism of World War II-era Japanese Americans.


Meals & memories

Two decades after Tom Stockley and his wife, Peggy, perished in a plane crash, their daughters curate a new book of his eating pleasures.


A life in design

Nin Truong brings creativity and sustainability to the world of public art, skateboarding and apparel.


August 31, 2021

Unbeatable, unforgettable

The national champion ’91 football team inspires the first UW Press book on Husky sports.


July 22, 2021

A fresh lens on QTPOC life

Through feature films, groundbreaking documentaries and shorts, a UW librarian creates a canon of meaningful representation in American cinema.


July 6, 2021

Seeing myself in a 125-year-old photograph

I'm a computer science major, but it was an art history class that shaped how I understand our complex and broken world, and also allowed me to better know myself as an Asian American.


June 10, 2021

Less can be more

Compared to changes that add, those that subtract are harder to think of. The removal of a bridge in the Bay Area illustrates how sometimes, less is more.


The B-Side

“The B-Side,” on display at the Henry Art Gallery, is a large-scale wall painting, is one of Gary Simmons’ “erasure drawings.”


June 7, 2021

Curiosity and clay

From the start, Seattle artist George Rodriguez explored identity, culture and community in his work.


Calling the shots

For Golf Channel analyst Paige Mackenzie, ’06, the only thing more thrilling than scoring a hole-in-one is calling the golf play-by-play at the Olympic Games.


June 3, 2021

Reliving ’91

The story of the greatest coach in Husky football history and how he led the 1991 team to the national championship is the subject of a new book.


May 11, 2021

‘Guests’ at the Burke

Artists Tony Johnson (naschio) and Adam McIsaac installed their sculpture, “Guests From the Great River,” just outside the Burke Museum.


High-flying professor

Cecilia Aragon’s memoir, “Flying Free,” is for “anybody who has been discouraged all their life,” she says.


Radical works

A little-seen series by Jacob Lawrence, one of the country’s most celebrated Black artists and one of the UW’s most beloved art professors, is now on view at the Seattle Art Museum.


April 17, 2021

Frontline photographer

Photographer David Ryder, ’06, ’11, was recently recognized as UW Bothell's Alumni of the Year recipient.


March 13, 2021

Surveying the Native art of the Pacific Northwest

Here's what it's like to be a student in the University of Washington's class about Indigenous art.


March 11, 2021

Bracing artistry

Residents in the School of Dentistry’s orthodontics program crafted wire sculptures using the materials of their profession.


Native knowledge

Native art is prominent in the life of Miranda Belarde-Lewis, an assistant professor in the University of Washington Information School.


March 9, 2021

Culture crew

Their commitment to equity brought three UW alumni to 4Culture—and it has remained the agency’s North Star in its pandemic response.


March 4, 2021

Private-eye inspiration

Instead, Thoft uses the P.I. skills she learned to write her award-winning detective novels featuring hard-nosed private eye Fina Ludlow.


March 3, 2021

Soul of Seattle

With the city changing rapidly, Ron Chew set out to write about one of its beloved communities. It’s a story only he could tell.


January 11, 2021

Books and conversation

To date, more than 1,600 readers have joined the UW Alumni Book Club, representing alumni from every college and school across all three campuses.


December 16, 2020

Emerging from pain

Britt East’s book “A Gay Man’s Guide to Life” provides realistic ways for gay men to deal with homophobia and live a good life.


Honoring our roots

In celebration of the Seattle Japanese Garden’s 60th birthday this summer, a number of local artists created works honoring the landscape and the people involved.


Whitman revisited

In “Unsettled Ground: The Whitman Massacre and Its Shifting Legacy in The American West,” historian Cassandra Tate, ’86, ’88, ’95, revisits a conflict that left 13 settlers dead.


December 9, 2020

Healing words

Norman B. Rice’s timing couldn’t have been better for his new book, “Gaining Public Trust: A Profile of Civic Engagement.”


November 12, 2020

A new face teaches American portraiture

Assistant Professor Juliet Sperling, pictured here, began teaching American art history at the University of Washington this fall. She took us on a tour of U.S. history by looking at 18 portraits over four centuries.


September 21, 2020

Future facing

A sculpture by Kenyan-American artist Wangechi Mutu will move to its new home at the UW in front of the plaza of the Hans Rosling Center for Population Health.


September 16, 2020

Book takes honors

A book by UW Tacoma Assistant Professor Emily Thuma won the 2020 Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Studies.


September 11, 2020

For our health

The UW is putting its combined brainpower into population health, improving lives around the world.


August 21, 2020

Make fine art with a UW professor, from his kitchen to yours

The chair of UW’s Printmaking Program designed a popular new class during the pandemic, stamping out doubt about how effective remote learning can be.


August 13, 2020

The historian of Seattle hip-hop

Daudi Abe, author of an upcoming book on Northwest rap, tells us what makes the local scene so special.


August 4, 2020

Stars in her eyes

Astronomer Emily Levesque’s new book shares the wonder of stargazing—and the adventures it’s taken her on.


June 26, 2020

When takeout takes you across the world

As restaurants scrambled to serve their customers during quarantine, Archipelago innovated with a fresh take on a Filipino immigrant tradition.


June 24, 2020

Remembering Lynn Shelton

Friend and collaborator Lacey Leavitt writes about the star of the Seattle film scene, who died on May 16.


June 10, 2020

Stranger than fiction

A writer faces frustration with the release of her first work of fiction during a pandemic.


The Wright eye

Virginia Bloedel Wright, 1929-2020, brought the Broken Obelisk to the UW and funded countless shows at the Henry Art Gallery.


Meet the photographer: Jackie Russo

A portrait photographer in Mexico City photographed eight UW teachers for our June 2020 issue.


Seafood stories

In "Salmon Sisters," Emma Teal Laukitis, ’18, and Claire Neaton share stories from their father's fishing vessel and their clean, elegant approach to food.


June 4, 2020

The joy of rereading

Like a good friendship, your relationship with a book can become richer as you get to know it better.


May 4, 2020

A brush with depth

Jake Prendez, ’00, knows what it's like to feel like an outsider. Now he offers fellow Latinx artists a place to showcase their work.


April 21, 2020

Julia Sweeney’s next act

After more than a decade away from showbiz, the actress and SNL alum is back and more brilliant than ever.


March 13, 2020

A life study

A devastating fire makes painter Grace Flott struggle for control of her body—and her life.


March 10, 2020

After the ashes

Scientists knew Mount St. Helens would come back to life after the 1980 eruption, but as a new book shows, its resilience still blew them away.


March 5, 2020

Wonder of Warashina

The Smithsonian honors Patti Warashina, ’62, ’64, whose humor and innovative perspectives on the human condition put a new face on ceramics.


December 26, 2019

Inside the peace

No one else could have written "Surviving the Peace," a new book by Peter Lippman, ’95, after decades of grassroots connections to the people of the Balkans.


September 28, 2019

Bedtime reading

Charles Johnson rounded up 11 of his “Bedtime Stories” from more than a decade—and added a new one—for a collection titled “Night Hawks: Stories.”


September 3, 2019

Where to find Filipino food in Seattle

From homestyle cooking to pop-ups with fusion flavors, here’s what our city’s Filipino food looks like, tastes like and means to the people who eat it.


September 2, 2019

Jordan Nicholson takes off

How the self-proclaimed lover of life followed his passions to become an accomplished photographer, artist and man about town.


July 9, 2019

Big on Broadway

Marc delaCruz, ’01, is making history in “Hamilton: An American Musical.”


June 2, 2019

Northwest dressed

From timber territory to tech hub, the Northwest passion for fashion has flourished.


World of worry

A new book by UW faculty explores anxiety-provoking topics ranging from food safety to mobile phones and bedbugs.


May 14, 2019

The many dimensions of Marvin Oliver

Oliver is the recipient of the 2019 Odegaard Award.


May 13, 2019

In Lynn we trust

Director Lynn Shelton's new film, "Sword of Trust," will open this year's Seattle International Film Festival.


March 29, 2019

‘Citizen Jean’

A new book about Seattle is an engaging history lesson for newcomers to the region and a juicy replay for old timers.


March 12, 2019

A tip of the toque is in order

Renee Erickson, ’95, is short-listed for Outstanding Chef at 2019 James Beard Awards.


March 5, 2019

Welcome to Noir Town

Greg Olson, film curator at the Seattle Art Museum, has been lurking in the shadows of the city's cinema scene for decades.


March 1, 2019

Master of the tearjerker

Tearjerkers and epic female-driven novels have earned Kristin Hannah, '83, an international following.


December 13, 2018

Hoaxes, humbug and lies

An interview about race and identity with poet and scholar Kevin Young.


December 8, 2018

how to be a partisan, alice gosti, choreographer gosti, italy gosti, alice gosti choreographer, uw school of dance

The language of dance

Contorting the imagination with choreographer Alice Gosti, ’08.


November 30, 2018

Gratefully remastered

A 1974 concert at Hec Ed Pavilion, long a favorite of Dead Heads, is one of six historic concerts being released in a beautiful new boxed set,


Myles Gaskin, ncaa football, gaskin, myles, running back myles gaskin, nfl running back, uw husky running back, pac 12, gaskin football, myles football, washington football, husky, huskies, quinn russell brown, quinn brown

The great Gaskin

How a kid from Lynnwood became the best running back in Husky history.


August 29, 2018

Career puppeteer

If these puppets could talk, they would describe Aurora Valentinetti as the UW's beloved puppeteer.


August 24, 2018

Rehashing Husky history

We chop it up with pop culture critic Chuck Klosterman.


July 2, 2018

Books: Understanding PTSD—and how to help

Secret Charles-Ford's experience of having a loved one dealing with PTSD inspired her to write the book “Vietnam, PTSD, and Therapy: Survived All That!”


Meet the beetles

Biology professor Jim Kenagy takes in the surprising beauty of ordinary life in wild places.


June 22, 2018

Art, identity on display at KEXP

Four Huskies presented the rawness of struggle and survival at the UWAA Short Talks on Art.


May 24, 2018

Meet the artist: Miha Sarani

The painter behind our June 2018 cover is a UW master's student.


April 5, 2018

Jamming through Japan

Jazz drummer Adam "Von" Baron, '97, is headed to Japan to tour his latest albums.


March 3, 2018

claire dederer

Perfectly Claire

Best-selling feminist author Claire Dederer, ’93, on growing up grunge, creating a literary canon for the Northwest, and bad men who create great art.


October 19, 2017

Painting labor

Arely Morales, '17, took inspiration from Latino artists and a poet in developing her style.


September 27, 2017

Life-changing documents

A quirky and thought-provoking new book from an iSchool professor.


Family fare

Screenwriter Temple Mathews teams up with his daughter to produce a romantic comedy for all ages.


September 20, 2017

no apparent distress

Books: UW pediatrics resident pens compelling coming-of-age memoir

“No Apparent Distress” by Rachel Pearson is a terrifying, compelling and excellent book about the American health care system.


September 14, 2017

Drama king

Tim Bond, '83, returns to the School of Drama as a professor.


September 7, 2017

Birdman

“We’re in the ideal spot for owls,” says Paul Bannick, a wildlife photographer who climbs trees and hikes tundra to capture images of the nocturnal predator.


August 18, 2017

Audobon honors

Heather Roskelley, ’83, made a magical image of a notoriously elusive bird.


July 17, 2017

Robert Osborne (1932-2017)

Remembering our famous host of Turner Classic Movies.


Age on your own terms

Anyone who is planning to get old should read this book.


March 3, 2017

Sol Moravia-Rosenberg, Sol, rap Seattle, UW poetry

Rhymes on the mic

Rooted in a rich legacy of rhymes, a new class of poets compose verses that channel their cultures and challenge the status quo.


March 2, 2017

‘Twin Peaks’ redux

Anchored by its UW star, “Twin Peaks” is coming back to the airwaves on May 21.


February 28, 2017

Emily Cabaniss

Libretti librarian

Emily Bolton Cabaniss, ’14, is the librarian for the Seattle Opera, one of only three opera companies in the entire U.S. to have their own librarian.


desert cathedral, Travis Gutierrez Senger

Reel success

Powered by a double degree in creative writing and drama from the UW, Travis Gutierrez Senger scored a breakthrough with his 2016 film, “Desert Cathedral."


A one-inch autograph

A high school essay by Bruce Lee is one of the earliest examples of his handwriting.


February 27, 2017

kathy hsieh

Dramatic dynamics

Stereotypes don't have a chance when Kathy Hsieh, '87, takes center stage.


January 26, 2017

Gregg Henry, Scandal, Hollis Doyle, ABC

Doing the Donald

Character actor Gregg Henry, '75, channels President Trump on ABC's "Scandal."


January 19, 2017

Drawing (for) a crowd

UW art professor David Brody is teaching the world to draw.


December 19, 2016

betty macdonald, paula becker, uw

From Betsy to Betty

Dropping out of college may be the best thing Betty MacDonald ever did. The irreverent author called it quits after studying design and drawing for one year at UW. A new book explores her outlandish life.


December 16, 2016

Up Close

A new exhibit surveying the work of Chuck Close, ’62, runs through April 2 at the Henry Art Gallery.


werner herzog, eric ames

Feel the Wern

Cinema professor Eric Ames, '93, is our guide through the mysterious mind of filmmaker Werner Herzog.


June 1, 2016

Nordic Noir

Scandinavian Studies Professor Andy Nestingen shares his research into the genre and how it contrasts with American Noir’s heroes and villains.