Books

September 4, 2021

The Nisei story

‘Boys in the Boat’ author Daniel James Brown’s new book depicts the heroism of World War II-era Japanese Americans.


Meals & memories

Two decades after Tom Stockley and his wife, Peggy, perished in a plane crash, their daughters curate a new book of his eating pleasures.


August 31, 2021

Unbeatable, unforgettable

The national champion ’91 football team inspires the first UW Press book on Husky sports.


June 10, 2021

Less can be more

Compared to changes that add, those that subtract are harder to think of. The removal of a bridge in the Bay Area illustrates how sometimes, less is more.


June 3, 2021

Reliving ’91

The story of the greatest coach in Husky football history and how he led the 1991 team to the national championship is the subject of a new book.


May 11, 2021

High-flying professor

Cecilia Aragon’s memoir, “Flying Free,” is for “anybody who has been discouraged all their life,” she says.


March 4, 2021

Private-eye inspiration

Instead, Thoft uses the P.I. skills she learned to write her award-winning detective novels featuring hard-nosed private eye Fina Ludlow.


March 3, 2021

Soul of Seattle

With the city changing rapidly, Ron Chew set out to write about one of its beloved communities. It’s a story only he could tell.


January 11, 2021

Books and conversation

To date, more than 1,600 readers have joined the UW Alumni Book Club, representing alumni from every college and school across all three campuses.


December 16, 2020

Emerging from pain

Britt East’s book “A Gay Man’s Guide to Life” provides realistic ways for gay men to deal with homophobia and live a good life.


Whitman revisited

In “Unsettled Ground: The Whitman Massacre and Its Shifting Legacy in The American West,” historian Cassandra Tate, ’86, ’88, ’95, revisits a conflict that left 13 settlers dead.


December 9, 2020

Healing words

Norman B. Rice’s timing couldn’t have been better for his new book, “Gaining Public Trust: A Profile of Civic Engagement.”


September 16, 2020

Book takes honors

A book by UW Tacoma Assistant Professor Emily Thuma won the 2020 Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Studies.


August 4, 2020

Stars in her eyes

Astronomer Emily Levesque’s new book shares the wonder of stargazing—and the adventures it’s taken her on.


June 10, 2020

Stranger than fiction

A writer faces frustration with the release of her first work of fiction during a pandemic.


Seafood stories

In "Salmon Sisters," Emma Teal Laukitis, ’18, and Claire Neaton share stories from their father's fishing vessel and their clean, elegant approach to food.


June 4, 2020

The joy of rereading

Like a good friendship, your relationship with a book can become richer as you get to know it better.


March 10, 2020

After the ashes

Scientists knew Mount St. Helens would come back to life after the 1980 eruption, but as a new book shows, its resilience still blew them away.


December 26, 2019

Inside the peace

No one else could have written "Surviving the Peace," a new book by Peter Lippman, ’95, after decades of grassroots connections to the people of the Balkans.


September 28, 2019

Bedtime reading

Charles Johnson rounded up 11 of his “Bedtime Stories” from more than a decade—and added a new one—for a collection titled “Night Hawks: Stories.”


June 2, 2019

World of worry

A new book by UW faculty explores anxiety-provoking topics ranging from food safety to mobile phones and bedbugs.


March 29, 2019

‘Citizen Jean’

A new book about Seattle is an engaging history lesson for newcomers to the region and a juicy replay for old timers.


March 1, 2019

Master of the tearjerker

Tearjerkers and epic female-driven novels have earned Kristin Hannah, '83, an international following.


July 2, 2018

Books: Understanding PTSD—and how to help

Secret Charles-Ford's experience of having a loved one dealing with PTSD inspired her to write the book “Vietnam, PTSD, and Therapy: Survived All That!”


Meet the beetles

Biology professor Jim Kenagy takes in the surprising beauty of ordinary life in wild places.


March 3, 2018

claire dederer

Perfectly Claire

Best-selling feminist author Claire Dederer, ’93, on growing up grunge, creating a literary canon for the Northwest, and bad men who create great art.


September 27, 2017

Life-changing documents

A quirky and thought-provoking new book from an iSchool professor.


September 20, 2017

no apparent distress

Books: UW pediatrics resident pens compelling coming-of-age memoir

“No Apparent Distress” by Rachel Pearson is a terrifying, compelling and excellent book about the American health care system.


July 17, 2017

Age on your own terms

Anyone who is planning to get old should read this book.


March 1, 2016

War is sexy. Huh?

David Shields, author, essayist and UW English professor, takes the New York Times to task in his book, "War Is Beautiful."


September 1, 2015

UW Press at 100

The University of Washington's press dates back to Edmond Meany's 1915 book on the governors of the state and territory.


September 1, 2014

Book store lifer

Louise Little is a University Book Store icon. She started 34 years ago as a cashier and is now CEO. But it all started when she read Nancy Drew as a kid.


March 1, 2014

'Silence is a coping mechanism'

Teresa Tamura captures poignant stories of hardship from a World War II relocation center in her book "Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp."


Conquering Everest

The first time I tried to climb Mount Everest was in the spring of 1987. It was a very different mountain then from the swarmed-over scene it’s become today.


December 1, 2013

Montana mindscape

Ivan Doig's tales of the West have made him one of America's top authors.


September 1, 2011

Common Book

To commemorate the University of Washington’s 150 years of discovery and inquiry, the 2011-12 Common Book is The Meaning of It All: Thoughts of a Citizen-Scientist by Richard Feynman.


June 1, 2011

Uncloaked

Books such as "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" are part of a crime novel tradition dating back to at least 1965 in Scandinavia—a tradition Andrew Nestingen, associate professor of Scandinavian Studies, has followed for years.


December 1, 2010

Special collection

The Henry Art Gallery, UW Libraries and UW Press are teaming up to bring the beauty of the Seattle Camera Club to the public.


'What Work Is'

“What Work Is” was featured in the 2010 UW Common Book, You Are Never Where You Are. Since 2006 the UW has chosen one book for all freshmen to read.


September 1, 2009

Books of revelation

Marilynne Robinson, ’68, ’77, has authored three novels, each of which is regarded as a major contribution to American letters.


March 1, 2009

Haunted hallways

When Kevin Rupprecht, '06, accepted the job of principal at Forks High School, he didn't realize he was signing on to be a minor celebrity as well.


Just call her a scholar

Ellen Dissanayake is working in a field she invented: evolutionary aesthetics, the study of art-making as an innate human behavior that helps us survive.


Evolution of art

Ellen Dissanayake came up with a paradigm-changing theory: Art-making evolved as a behavior that contained advantages for human survival-and those advantages went far beyond what Charles Darwin ever imagined.


December 1, 2006

100 books by Huskies

To celebrate the literary achievements of our UW community, the editors of Columns asked 15 faculty, alumni and book publishing professionals to help choose 100 outstanding books by 100 UW authors.


The black TV book

Kathleen Fearn-Banks once worked in TV, and now has written the dictionary on an important part of its history.


Book report

For a long time we’ve wanted to celebrate the creative power of the University of Washington by presenting 100 top books by 100 UW authors. While the idea sounds great on paper, coming up with the final list was no easy task. What follows is an editor’s diary of the selection process. 


June 1, 2006

‘Common book’

“Mountains Beyond Mountains” was named the UW's first-ever "common book." Every member of the incoming freshman class will be reading the book this summer, and thinking, talking and writing about it this fall.


December 1, 2003

Author's inspiration

Michele Torrey, '88, was having trouble finding books for her three teen-age sons. She decided to fix that problem by writing one herself.


June 1, 2002

Reversal of fortune

For more and more workers, the American Dream is just a mirage, say the authors of a new book.


June 1, 2001

She has answers

Taking the “if you want something done, do it yourself” mentality her parents instilled in her, Carol Bolt, ’94, a Seattle artist, wrote The Book of Answers.


December 1, 1998

Martyrs and myths

The early Christians weren't all martyrs and they weren't all poor, says a UW sociologist whose book sheds new light on the rise of the Christianity.


June 1, 1993

Tales of ‘Solidarity’

UW alumnus and retired UW lecturer Richard (Dick) Carbray, '44, '51, has written a new book titled "Prophets of Human Solidarity."


March 1, 1993

Insights on race

"The challenge for America is how to live in peace with its different people. If that's not solved, the country is really in trouble."


September 1, 1991

Ann Rule, ’53

A former policewoman, Ann Rule began writing true-detective crime in 1968, after a divorce left her with four children to support.


June 1, 1991

Literary fame

UW English Professor Charles Johnson, is holding steady through the months of accolades that have followed winning the 1990 National Book Award in fiction.


March 1, 1991

Johnson wins award

Charles Johnson, UW professor of English, received the 1990 National Book Award for Middle Passage.