Medicine

May 15, 2020

Hands off the soap, briefly

Hot water and soap is keeping us healthy, but it can wear down our skin. We ask a UW Medicine dermatologist for help.


August 6, 2018

Diabetes nation

We talk about the state of diabetes with Ira Hirsch, the UW’s Diabetes Treatment and Teaching Chair.


June 4, 2018

Drug price isn't right

There’s a new blockbuster drug that could save the lives of thousands of people with type 2 diabetes in the U.S.


April 5, 2018

Genetic fortune telling

Thanks to services such as 23andMe, genetics has gone mainstream. But should you believe the hype?


March 5, 2018

Stop the bleed

It only takes a few minutes to bleed to death, but bystanders with a little knowledge can save lives.


January 9, 2018

Rural rescue

Connecting UW Medicine research to primary care clinics around the region.


December 15, 2017

The puzzle of aging

Building on decades of research and outreach, UW experts are piecing together new ways to live longer and better.


June 15, 2017

'If we don't, who will?'

A family eager to help their son has helped make the UW a leader in facing down an insidious disease.


March 1, 2017

population health

Finding a solution

Tackling the most vexing medical problems facing humankind.


population health

Cancer calamity

Disparities in health care access hit communities of color hard—particularly when it comes to cancer.


population health, global health, health care, uw medicine

Diet and disease

How UW researchers are mapping and combating health disparities.


population health, global health, health care

Tending to the world

Scientists, doctors and data collectors join forces for population health.


February 28, 2017

Failure to grow

About 162 million children worldwide under the age of five are considered too short for their age—a growth failure called stunting.


We heart UW

If you need a heart transplant, here’s your prescription: come to UW Medical Center.


March 1, 2016

Test driven

Here, we present the tales of two clinical trials of technology that one day could alleviate suffering and improve lives for the hundreds of thousands of people suffering from severe heart problems and kidney failure.


June 1, 2015

Blood stancher

An injectable polymer could keep soldiers and trauma patients from bleeding to death.


Mindfulness

Whether it’s coping with college or taming an addiction, mindfulness has real medical and practical benefits, and it’s something UW researchers have been exploring for decades.


Hazy on the law

More than two years after Washington legalized marijuana, parents and teens may be hazy on the specifics of the law.


March 1, 2015

Brain discovery

A couple of years ago a scientist looking at dozens of MRI scans of human brains noticed something surprising: a large fiber pathway that seemed to be part of the network of connections that process visual information.


Brain spotting

Football concussions get a lot of attention, but UW researchers want to know how a single brain injury can affect an ordinary person decades down the line.


December 1, 2014

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Clues from bird brains

Brain cells that multiply to help birds sing their best during breeding season are known to die back naturally later in the year. For the first time, researchers have described the series of events that cue new neuron growth each spring.


June 1, 2014

Cosmetic enhancement

Millions of people each year remove wrinkles, soften creases and plump up their lips by having a physician inject a gel-like material into their facial tissue. These cosmetic procedures are sometimes called “liquid facelifts” and are said to be minimally invasive. It’s rare, but sometimes things go wrong.


March 1, 2014

Brain sugar

A growing body of evidence suggests that the brain plays a key role in glucose regulation and the development of type 2 diabetes.


Genetic echo

Researchers led by Dr. John Stamatoyannopoulos have discovered a second code hiding within DNA. This second code contains information that changes how scientists read the instructions contained in DNA and interpret mutations to make sense of health and disease.


December 1, 2013

Autism onset

Between ages 3 and 10, children with autism spectrum disorder exhibit distinct brain chemical changes that differ from children with developmental delays and those with typical development, according to a new study led by UW researchers.


September 1, 2013

Keeping kids clean and sober

An answer to teen drug use isn’t quite as simple as “just say no.” Many teenagers know they are supposed to say no to tobacco, alcohol and other drugs but they don’t know why.


June 1, 2013

Probing DNA

The University of Washington Adult Medical Genetics Clinic is not only well-established—both UW and Johns Hopkins started the first genetics programs in 1957—but is widely considered the best in the world.


March 1, 2013

Trisomy trials

Certain medical problems experienced by people with Down Syndrome may eventually be helped because of a research breakthrough at the UW.


Solving IBS

The cause and treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome are complex problems that researchers at the UW School of Nursing are systematically addressing.


Future of medicine

The answer to developing a quick fix for a virus? (Or the answers to a whole host of other medical issues?) It might be found in proteins.


Quick implant

Sixty minutes was all it took for Jordan Prutkin, a UW cardiologist, to implant a new, improved kind of defibrillator in Merle Yoney’s chest.


December 1, 2012

Longer CPR, longer life?

Hospitals that continue CPR longer have better survival rates for patients whose hearts have stopped beating, according to a study led by Zachary Goldberger, Acting Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at Harborview Medical Center.


Blind mice see the light

Researchers who injected a new chemical into the eyes of blind mice made the mice sensitive to light, a finding that could hold promise for people with disease that cause blindness.


Fibbing on fat

When it comes to reporting whether we’ve lost or gained weight over the previous year, we may not be lying exactly but many of us are guilty of wishful thinking.


Better imaging

Lodespin Labs, a new company founded by UW researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering with support from UW’s Center for Commercialization, may help solve a worrying problem in health care.


September 1, 2012

Hope for broken hearts

Cardiology researchers at the UW are engaged in exciting work to explore whether a patient’s own stem cells can foster the regeneration of damaged heart muscle.


June 1, 2012

A bridge to life

A backpack power supply runs the artificial heart Chris Marshall received from UW Medical Center.


March 1, 2012

New wisdom on teeth

Dr. Greg Huang, Chairman of the UW Department of Orthodontics, says, that for those whose wisdom teeth are developing normally, a watchful waiting approach may be reasonable.


June 1, 2011

Risk factor

Sudden cardiac death affects about 1 in 43,000 NCAA athletes, according to a new UW study.


March 1, 2011

Surgery offers hope

University of Washington surgeons in October performed the world’s first surgical procedure to implant a device that could give hope to millions of people suffering from Ménière’s disease — an insidious, mysterious disorder.


December 1, 2010

Medicine for the masses

Using business, medical and engineering smarts, UW alumni are solving medical problems in Washington and beyond.


September 1, 2010

Damaging waves

A team of UW and Veterans Affairs researchers has gathered the first direct evidence that blast waves from roadside bombs can cause long-term changes in soldiers’ brains.


June 1, 2010

Birth of a field

Mary Hebert is head of the UW Obstetric-Fetal Pharmacology Research Unit, which recently received a $5 million grant to continue its work on the clinical pharmacology of medications during pregnancy.


March 1, 2010

Seeing red

Jay and Maureen Neitz, who joined the UW School of Medicine faculty in 2008, reported in the journal Nature that they had cured color-blindness in two squirrel monkeys using gene therapy.


Breast cancer detection

An inexpensive, noninvasive test can accurately detect breast cancer in younger women, and has the potential to spare thousands from unnecessary surgeries and biopsies, according to new UW research.


MRSA digs in

Dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria are gaining a foothold in the natural environment, suggests recent research from the UW School of Public Health.


December 1, 2009

New prescription

The practice of pharmacy is changing these days, thanks in large part to the innovations developed by the University of Washington School of Pharmacy, a national leader in health-care research and in meeting the needs of the community.


September 1, 2009

Responding to H1N1

When a new influenza virus, Influenza A H1N1, or “swine flu,” emerged last spring, Anne Marie Kimball, a professor of epidemiology and health services at UW School of Public Health, was on the front lines of the information response.


March 1, 2009

The healing arts

Last fall, the UW School of Medicine and the Henry Art Gallery teamed up to offer a new course to help medical students develop their diagnostic skills by visiting art museums.


Knowing the enemy

A little more than 10 years ago, Kristin Swanson, a graduate student in applied mathematics at the UW, began work on an audacious project: an equation to model the growth and spread of brain tumors in individual patients.


Missing shots

Childhood vaccination rates are increasing, but not as quickly as many governments around the world have claimed. That's the conclusion of a new study by researchers at the UW Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME).


June 1, 2007

Bad blood

As many as 3 million Americans are carrying the hepatitis C virus — but most don’t even know it. The UW is trying to crack its code before more potential carriers get the bad news.


March 1, 2007

The metal debate

A pioneering UW study confirms that metal dental fillings are safe, but critics still aren't satisfied.


December 1, 2006

New generation

UW scientists have made important first steps toward the day when they will be able to grow livers, hearts and other replacement tissue from stem cells.


September 1, 2006

50 years for the heart

Fifty years ago, the UW perfected its own heart-lung machine and did the first open-heart bypass surgery in the West. Now advances are coming so quickly that they could put future cardiac surgeons out of business.


June 1, 2006

Infant screening

A relatively simple screening process detects enzyme deficiencies in newborns, allowing treatment to begin before too much damage has been done.


March 1, 2006

Unbroken spirits

When an accident broke Kirk Hennig's neck, he was sent to one of the best rehabilitation centers in the nation, led by one of its top doctors. Now he's sharing his insights with other injured patients.


June 1, 2005

Antibiotics won't do it

Could bacteria also be a culprit in heart disease? In April the UW released the first results of a study — and the verdict so far for C. pneumoniae is not guilty.


March 1, 2005

Painful data

It’s bad enough to suffer from migraines, but now there is a correlation with another brain malady. Migraine sufferers are twice as likely to experience a stroke, compared to people who do not get this type of headache, say UW researchers.


March 1, 2004

Income-weight link

Healthy foods that aid in weight loss and provide a feeling of fullness cost more than energy-dense foods such as French fries, soft drinks, candy and cookies. The result: poor people are more likely to be overweight.


December 1, 2002

Breakthrough research

UW researchers announced a dramatic breakthrough—they were able to insert the missing gene into these defective mice and reverse the effects of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.


September 1, 2002

Diabetes discovery

Discovery of a gene that plays a major role in type 1 diabetes in rats and is present in nearly identical form in humans might shed light on the little understood processes of the thymus, a research team including University of Washington scientists announced.


June 1, 2002

Fatal inheritance

After losing her mother and brother to pancreatic cancer, Sheri Mayer faced the difficult choice of having her pancreas removed or trying to beat the odds.


December 1, 2001

Nobel Laureate

UW Genetics Professor Lee Hartwell won the 2001 Nobel Prize in Medicine/Physiology for his basic research on cell division.


Sound solution

UW scientists, with the aid of some bird brains, may have found an answer to hearing loss: bringing dead cells back to life.


Appendix misfires

In nearly one of four appendectomies performed in women of childbearing age, the removed appendix is actually not infected, according to a UW study.


September 1, 2001

Turning off TB

UW Pathobiology Professor David Sherman announced that he was able to interrupt the function of a TB gene that allows the bacterium to go dormant.


June 1, 2001

Fighting depression

A UW study found that several brief office visits along with continuing telephone calls or even e-mail can help prevent a relapse of depression.


December 1, 2000

Why cells go bad

Once just a theory, Lawrence Loeb's mutation breakthrough could lead to new cancer treatments and even an unconventional way to stop AIDS.


September 1, 2000

Heart attack study

Older women are less likely to receive early treatment following a heart attack than older men and are more likely to be assigned a do-not-resuscitate order during their hospital stay, UW researchers reported.


December 1, 1999

Magnetic relief

Depression's victims sometimes find that drugs and therapy can't help. Soon there may be a new solution — the power of magnetism.


Dyslexia research

UW researchers found that dyslexic children use nearly five times the brain area as normal children while performing a simple language task.


September 1, 1999

For the heart

UW Professor Thomas Grayston is principal investigator of an $11 million grant to see if killing a form of bacteria reduces heart attacks.


June 1, 1999

Fooling the body

UW researchers are one step closer to creating artificial bones, tissue and organs that the human body will recognize as its own.


March 1, 1998

Deafness gene

UW Postdoctoral Fellow Eric D. Lynch successfully cloned a gene which, when mutated, causes an inherited form of deafness.


September 1, 1997

Vitamins could help asthmatics, research finds

Simply taking antioxidant vitamins could help asthmatics exposed to polluted air breathe easier.


Nurse midwives keep cost, Caesarean rates lower, study finds

Low-risk women who choose nurse midwives for their deliveries have fewer Caesarean sections, a UW study found.


June 1, 1997

At research center, patients take on risk for the sake of a cure

From bone marrow transplants to cancer vaccines, patients in the Clinical Research Center opt for experiments that could save lives, maybe even their own.


Drugs, surgery show equal results for heart-attack patients in study

Heart attack patients show nearly identical survival rates, whether treated with powerful anti-clotting drugs or with balloon angioplasty, say UW researchers.


March 1, 1997

Lab mice stay thin on a fast-food diet

UW scientists have produced a genetic mutation that keeps laboratory mice thin even on a very high-fat diet.


December 1, 1996

Researchers work to create medical implants that bodies won’t reject

UW bioengineers hope to fool the body into accepting foreign materials, opening the door to artificial kidneys, bionic hip replacements and other medical miracles.


Pausing the pain

UW doctors turn to drugs, hypnosis and even virtual reality to ease patients’ suffering.


September 1, 1996

Genes unlock the mysteries of the immune system

Scientists have uncovered some powerful and surprising information about the human immune system.


Cancer detective

After discovering the gene linked to breast cancer, Mary-Claire King now is on the hunt for ways to combat the disease.


June 1, 1996

Modern plagues

Once beaten by miracle drugs, infectious diseases are back and stronger than ever.


Women at greater risk of death after heart attack treatment

An international team of researchers found that women treated for heart attack with blood clot-dissolving drugs have a considerably greater risk of death and serious complications compared to men.


New hope for ways to reverse breast and ovarian cancers

Biologists have found the first direct evidence suggesting that the gene known to cause hereditary forms of breast and ovarian cancers can also halt—and in some cases reverse—both diseases.


March 1, 1996

Ultrasound: the ultimate Band-Aid?

Sound waves could be used to control internal bleeding suffered by soldiers on the battlefield or motorists in a car wreck if a $10 million UW research project is successful.


December 1, 1995

UW study links low folic acid levels to heart disease

UW researchers have found a "strong link" between diets lacking folic acid—found in high levels in orange juice, spinach and dried beans—and heart-related problems.


September 1, 1995

Estrogen-cancer link disproved

Women who take estrogen or a combination of estrogen and progestin as hormone replacement therapy apparently do not face an increased risk of breast cancer.


June 1, 1995

Below the belt

Work on male fertility and potency have also made the UW a national leader in advancing men's sexual health.


Meds raise risk

Calcium-channel blockers, widely prescribed to lower high blood pressure, may actually increase the risk of heart attack by as much as 60 percent.


March 1, 1995

Hope against Alzheimer's

Almost half of all Americans over 85 have Alzheimer's, but hope is on the horizon as UW research begins to break its secrets.


December 1, 1994

Binge drinking research

UW psychologists reduced the dangers of binge drinking in college students through specialized counseling.


New test for chlamydia

UW researchers have demonstrated new tests that can accurately detect the presence of chlamydia in a simple urine sample.


September 1, 1994

Freeze on cancer

Tumors in the prostate and liver have a new nemesis in the Pacific Northwest—a UW Medical Center machine that can freeze and destroy cancer cells.


SIDS research

UW medical student Michael Emery published the first experiment that links infant steroid hormones to breathing patterns during sleep.


June 1, 1994

Parkinson’s assist

Sport glasses that allow a viewer to watch TV while mowing the lawn may someday allow Parkinson's disease victims to walk at a normal pace.


Floss-free life?

Dental researchers at the UW reported that an experimental vaccine protects monkeys from gum disease.