Medicine

April 5, 2018

Genetic fortune telling

Thanks to services such as 23andMe, genetics has gone mainstream. But should you believe the hype?


March 5, 2018

Stop the bleed

It only takes a few minutes to bleed to death, but bystanders with a little knowledge can save lives.


January 9, 2018

Rural rescue

Connecting UW Medicine research to primary care clinics around the region.


December 15, 2017

The puzzle of aging

Building on decades of research and outreach, UW experts are piecing together new ways to live longer and better.


June 15, 2017

'If we don't, who will?'

A family eager to help their son has helped make the UW a leader in facing down an insidious disease.


March 1, 2017

population health

Finding a solution

Tackling the most vexing medical problems facing humankind.


population health

Cancer calamity

Disparities in health care access hit communities of color hard—particularly when it comes to cancer.


population health, global health, health care, uw medicine

Diet and disease

How UW researchers are mapping and combating health disparities.


population health, global health, health care

Tending to the world

Scientists, doctors and data collectors join forces for population health.


February 28, 2017

Failure to grow

About 162 million children worldwide under the age of five are considered too short for their age—a growth failure called stunting.


We heart UW

If you need a heart transplant, here’s your prescription: come to UW Medical Center.


March 1, 2016

Test driven

Here, we present the tales of two clinical trials of technology that one day could alleviate suffering and improve lives for the hundreds of thousands of people suffering from severe heart problems and kidney failure.


June 1, 2015

Blood stancher

An injectable polymer could keep soldiers and trauma patients from bleeding to death.


Mindfulness

Whether it’s coping with college or taming an addiction, mindfulness has real medical and practical benefits, and it’s something UW researchers have been exploring for decades.


Hazy on the law

More than two years after Washington legalized marijuana, parents and teens may be hazy on the specifics of the law.


March 1, 2015

Brain discovery

A couple of years ago a scientist looking at dozens of MRI scans of human brains noticed something surprising: a large fiber pathway that seemed to be part of the network of connections that process visual information.


Brain spotting

Football concussions get a lot of attention, but UW researchers want to know how a single brain injury can affect an ordinary person decades down the line.


December 1, 2014

Can't weight


Clues from bird brains

Brain cells that multiply to help birds sing their best during breeding season are known to die back naturally later in the year. For the first time, researchers have described the series of events that cue new neuron growth each spring.


June 1, 2014

Cosmetic enhancement

Millions of people each year remove wrinkles, soften creases and plump up their lips by having a physician inject a gel-like material into their facial tissue. These cosmetic procedures are sometimes called “liquid facelifts” and are said to be minimally invasive. It’s rare, but sometimes things go wrong.


March 1, 2014

Brain sugar

A growing body of evidence suggests that the brain plays a key role in glucose regulation and the development of type 2 diabetes.


Genetic echo

Researchers led by Dr. John Stamatoyannopoulos have discovered a second code hiding within DNA. This second code contains information that changes how scientists read the instructions contained in DNA and interpret mutations to make sense of health and disease.


December 1, 2013

Autism onset

Between ages 3 and 10, children with autism spectrum disorder exhibit distinct brain chemical changes that differ from children with developmental delays and those with typical development, according to a new study led by UW researchers.


September 1, 2013

Keeping kids clean and sober

An answer to teen drug use isn’t quite as simple as “just say no.” Many teenagers know they are supposed to say no to tobacco, alcohol and other drugs but they don’t know why.


June 1, 2013

Probing DNA

The University of Washington Adult Medical Genetics Clinic is not only well-established—both UW and Johns Hopkins started the first genetics programs in 1957—but is widely considered the best in the world.


March 1, 2013

Trisomy trials

Certain medical problems experienced by people with Down Syndrome may eventually be helped because of a research breakthrough at the UW.


Solving IBS

The cause and treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome are complex problems that researchers at the UW School of Nursing are systematically addressing.


Future of medicine

The answer to developing a quick fix for a virus? (Or the answers to a whole host of other medical issues?) It might be found in proteins.


Quick implant

Sixty minutes was all it took for Jordan Prutkin, a UW cardiologist, to implant a new, improved kind of defibrillator in Merle Yoney’s chest.


December 1, 2012

Longer CPR, longer life?

Hospitals that continue CPR longer have better survival rates for patients whose hearts have stopped beating, according to a study led by Zachary Goldberger, Acting Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at Harborview Medical Center.


Blind mice see the light

Researchers who injected a new chemical into the eyes of blind mice made the mice sensitive to light, a finding that could hold promise for people with disease that cause blindness.


Fibbing on fat

When it comes to reporting whether we’ve lost or gained weight over the previous year, we may not be lying exactly but many of us are guilty of wishful thinking.


Better imaging

Lodespin Labs, a new company founded by UW researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering with support from UW’s Center for Commercialization, may help solve a worrying problem in health care.


September 1, 2012

Hope for broken hearts

Cardiology researchers at the UW are engaged in exciting work to explore whether a patient’s own stem cells can foster the regeneration of damaged heart muscle.


March 1, 2009

The healing arts

Last fall, the UW School of Medicine and the Henry Art Gallery teamed up to offer a new course to help medical students develop their diagnostic skills by visiting art museums.


Knowing the enemy

A little more than 10 years ago, Kristin Swanson, a graduate student in applied mathematics at the UW, began work on an audacious project: an equation to model the growth and spread of brain tumors in individual patients.


Missing shots

Childhood vaccination rates are increasing, but not as quickly as many governments around the world have claimed. That's the conclusion of a new study by researchers at the UW Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME).