STEM

April 5, 2018

International problem solvers

Outside of the classroom, UW engineering students solve problems around the world.


March 13, 2018

New point of view

Lisa Zurk, ’95, will be the first woman to lead the Applied Physics Laboratory.


March 6, 2018

Cyber safe

Stefan Savage, ’02, earned a MacArthur "genius" grant for his work on cyber security.


December 15, 2017

The puzzle of aging

Building on decades of research and outreach, UW experts are piecing together new ways to live longer and better.


December 8, 2017

Engineering on the brain

Doctors, engineers and other experts work together at the UW Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering.


December 7, 2017

The opioid boom

The prevailing practice for treating addiction to painkillers led to the worst man-made epidemic in modern medical history.


June 27, 2017

Welcome back, Paul Allen

Before he funded UW's computer science labs, Paul Allen got kicked out of them.


June 16, 2017

elephant art wolfe, sam wasser

Animal instinct

Biology professor Sam Wasser fights to save endangered species.


March 1, 2017

population health, global health, health care, uw medicine

Gates gift

A historic $279 million donation will enable the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation to forecast health scenarios.


population health, global health, health care

Tending to the world

Scientists, doctors and data collectors join forces for population health.


February 27, 2017

Yes, it's rocket science. Really.

Inspired by the film "Hidden Figures," the Obama White House honored a group of women of color who have contributed to NASA’s success. Two UW alumnae were included.


September 1, 2016

Deep data

In April 2015, the Axial Seamount, an active underwater volcano about 300 miles off the coast of Oregon, erupted. For the first time ever, scientists, engineers and students from the UW and around the world could watch it in real time thanks to an elaborate array of sensors they installed a year earlier.


The batwoman

Forget the silly myths about vampires. Sharlene Santana discovered that the role of bats in the environment is underrated. And most don't want to bite you.


December 1, 2015

Tech that knows

A new wearable technology developed at the UW called MagnifiSense can detect what devices and vehicles the user interacts with.


Swim record

UW fisheries expert puts a number on Bristol Bay's annual sockeye salmon run.


September 1, 2015

High volume

Recordings by current and former UW researchers in fjords show that melting at glacier edges in the narrow rock-edged canyons are some of the noisiest places in the sea.


Cellphone guilt

A new UW study finds that cellphone use at playgrounds is a significant source of parental guilt, as well as a powerful distraction when children try to get caregivers’ attention.


Cling like a fish

Scooting around in the shallow, coastal waters of Puget Sound is one of the world’s best suction cups. It’s called the Northern clingfish, and its small, finger-sized body uses suction forces to hold up to 150 times its own body weight.


Space explorers

Fifty years is no time at all for a universe that dates back 13.8 billion. But for those who study the sky, the past five decades have changed everything.


March 1, 2015

Mirage Earths

Planets orbiting close to low-mass stars—the most common stars in the universe—are prime targets in the search for extraterrestrial life. But new research led by an astronomy graduate student at the UW indicates some such planets may have long since lost their chance at hosting life.


Baby face

It’s a game parents like to play: What will my child look like when she grows up? A computer could now answer the question in less than a minute.


December 1, 2014

Phone training

Mobile phones have become second-nature for most people. What’s coming next, say UW researchers, is the ability to interact with our devices not just with touchscreens, but through gestures in the space around the phone.


Toddler logic

Researchers have found that children as young as 2 intuitively use mathematical concepts such as probability to help make sense of the world.


September 1, 2014

Fighter flies

University of Washington researchers used an array of high-speed video cameras operating at 7,500 frames a second to capture the wing and body motion of flies after they encountered a looming image of an approaching predator.


Robot response

UW electrical engineers have developed telerobotics technology that could make disaster response faster and more efficient.


About everything

Computer scientists from the UW and the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence in Seattle have created the first fully automated computer program that teaches everything there is to know about any visual concept.


June 1, 2014

Deep into oceans

The chemistry of the ocean has changed dramatically over the decades that Terrie Klinger has been studying her beloved West Coast waters.


Robot observers

This fall the UW will complete installation of a massive digital ocean observatory. Dozens of instruments will connect to power and Internet cables on the sea floor, but the observatory also includes a new generation of ocean explorers: robots that will zoom up and down through almost two miles of ocean to monitor the water conditions and marine life above.


Mobile medicine

A collaboration between UW Computer Science and Engineering and PATH, a Seattle-area non-governmental organization, has led to a simple, ingenious solution to a dilemma facing women in Sub-Saharan Africa who wish to store breast milk. While medical care and safe water are not always available, most Africans today have smartphones.


March 1, 2014

Lake Mars

The mystery of how the surface of Mars, long dead and dry, could have flowed with water billions of years ago may have been solved by research that included a University of Washington astronomer.


Got data. Now what?

At the UW, the best minds are collaborating to ask questions and harness the power of “Big Data” to find answers and seek solutions to advance the common good.