Social Sciences

March 26, 2018

From playdough to Plato

Children are by nature philosophical thinkers—ready to take on heady topics like race, fairness and human rights.


March 4, 2018

The man who made us look

Psychology professor Anthony Greenwald developed the Implicit Association Test, a rapid-fire survey that reveals the biases that lurk inside us.


December 11, 2017

History lessons

After Charlottesville clash, a history professor heard echoes of an ugly era.


September 28, 2017

Understanding homelessness

"It's a symptom of a bigger disease of our society."


June 12, 2017

pound of flesh, alexes harris, fines and fees

Legal loop

Fees and fines are the punishment that keeps on giving in the criminal justice system.


May 25, 2017

microaggressions, john crowley

Micro-damaging

Overt racism has long been linked to health disparities, but what about subtle slights?


February 28, 2017

Kristy Leissle, daN BATES, chocolate uw, cocoa uw

Dr. Chocolate

UW Bothell lecturer Kristy Leissle is a leading researcher of the global cocoa trade.


June 1, 2016

Nordic Noir

Scandinavian Studies Professor Andy Nestingen shares his research into the genre and how it contrasts with American Noir’s heroes and villains.


December 1, 2015

'Scarface' found

A team of scientists has identified a new species of “pre-mammal” based on fossils unearthed in Zambia’s Luangwa Basin in 2009. Its discoverers include Christian Sidor, UW professor of biology and curator of vertebrate paleontology at the Burke Museum.


Sweet gratitude

Gratitude is universally considered a social good—the warm feeling that results from a kindness received. But it can have a dark side: It can impel us to eat more sweets, according to new research by Ann Schlosser, professor of marketing at the Foster School of Business.


September 1, 2015

Cellphone guilt

A new UW study finds that cellphone use at playgrounds is a significant source of parental guilt, as well as a powerful distraction when children try to get caregivers’ attention.


Space explorers

Fifty years is no time at all for a universe that dates back 13.8 billion. But for those who study the sky, the past five decades have changed everything.


June 1, 2015

Mindfulness

Whether it’s coping with college or taming an addiction, mindfulness has real medical and practical benefits, and it’s something UW researchers have been exploring for decades.


A startling find

Since she was a student in pharmacy school, Shelly Gray has felt a strong connection to the situation many elderly patients find themselves in: “I was struck by how many different medications older adults are taking, as well as their struggle with trying to keep those medications straight,” she recalls.


December 1, 2013

Distracted drivers

In Washington state’s first study to examine driver use of electronic devices, UW investigators saw that more than 8 percent of drivers were engaging with such devices behind the wheel, higher than previously estimated.


September 1, 2012

USDA report off base

If you fill your shopping cart with healthy foods, it will cost you less than if you purchased highly processed “junk” food full of high fat and sugar content, the U.S. Department of Agriculture says. Not so, says Adam Drewnowski, professor of epidemiology in the UW School of Public Health.


Tree-sized benefits

Professor James Lutz, UW research scientist in environmental and forest sciences, is the lead author of the largest quantitative study yet on the importance of big trees in temperate forests.


Champions for children

Under a new arrangement with the State of Washington, the UW School of Social Work will lead the first comprehensive statewide program to train social workers and caregivers who work with Washington’s vulnerable children and families.


December 1, 2011

Tall order

Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, Earth and Space Sciences Professors Bernard Hallet and Howard Conway are trying to determine whether glaciers speed up or slow erosion in the Himalaya.


The market knows

The next time you hear the federal government announce that the gross domestic product has dropped, say, 3 percent, don’t believe it. Instead, look to the stock market.


More talk, less pot

A study shows that a brief, voluntary chat with an adult led to a 20 percent decrease in marijuana use for teens who are frequent users.


March 1, 2011

An eye on soldiers

The U.S. Department of Defense awarded a five-year grant to the University of Washington School of Social Work’s Innovative Programs Research Group to develop and test an intervention for at-risk soldiers.


Hope for polar bears

Scientists from several institutions, including the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Washington, have found that if humans reduce greenhouse gas emissions significantly in the next 10-20 years, enough Arctic ice is likely to remain intact during late summer and early autumn for polar bears to survive.


Iceberg's tune

We love the enchanting songs of whales, the clicks and squeals from porpoises. And now, a University of Washington oceanographer has brought us more melodies from the deep.


September 1, 2010

Elephant vs. bird

Elephants may be the biggest factor in the impending disappearance of a tiny bird.


June 1, 2010

Greener roads

A UW team has helped develop the world’s first system to rate the sustainability of road construction and maintenance projects.


Aging dinosaurs

A new fossil find suggests that the roots of the dinosaurs’ family tree are deeper than previously thought.


March 1, 2010

Getting the dirt

In a barren pit on Vashon Island, UW School of Forest Resources graduate student Kate Kurtz is growing a forest—and fighting climate change along the way.


Lightning listener

Call him the lightning listener. Robert Holzworth, UW professor of earth and space sciences, directs the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), a series of stations around the globe that monitor pulses of radio waves generated by lightning strokes.


December 1, 2009

Tree power

Researchers at MIT discovered electrical currents in trees last year, and now a UW team has built an electronic circuit that runs on tree power.


September 1, 2009

Long look underseas

Seagliders, under development since 1995 at the UW’s School of Oceanography and Applied Physics Laboratory, have repeatedly set world endurance and range records for autonomous underwater vehicles.


June 1, 2009

Sweet spot

Parents may be able to chalk up their children’s preference for the tooth-achingly sweet to growing pains. That’s the possibility raised by new research led by UW Professor of Dental Public Health Sciences Susan Coldwell.


Rare fish find

When it comes to weird fish, Ted Pietsch, a UW professor of aquatic and fishery sciences and curator of fishes at the Burke Museum, has seen it all. But the creature discovered early last year off Ambon Island, in the Indonesian archipelago, surprised even him.


Feeling the heat

A study commissioned by the state Legislature is the most comprehensive look yet at how climate change is likely to affect the state.


Orca's best friend

The best way to gauge a whale’s health is to study its scat, and that requires a little Lab work.


March 1, 2009

Songbirds' secrets

UW Professor of Psychology and Zoology Michael Beecher wanted to understand the social dimensions of learning how and from whom birds learn to sing in the wild. So he and his students began tramping through the thickets of Seattle's Discovery Park to find out.


The healing arts

Last fall, the UW School of Medicine and the Henry Art Gallery teamed up to offer a new course to help medical students develop their diagnostic skills by visiting art museums.


December 1, 2008

Prevention works

Towns providing programs aimed at reducing juvenile delinquency are not only seeing results, but in less time than anticipated, according to a UW-led study.


September 1, 2008

Nature's calmer

When it comes to defeating stress, hi-def can’t hold a candle to the real thing, according to a study by the UW Human Interaction with Nature and Technological Systems Lab.


School of Robofish

UW researchers have put a new spin on the fin: they’ve made a robotic fish that can communicate with its schoolmates.


September 1, 2007

Woes of Kilimanjaro

UW researchers say global warming has nothing to do with the decline of Kilimanjaro’s ice, and using the mountain in northern Tanzania as a “poster child” for climate change is simply inaccurate.


June 1, 2007

Toddlers take a cue

For the first time, UW researchers have confirmed that toddlers engage in “emotional eavesdropping”—changing their own behavior in response to an emotional exchange that does not involve them.


Ocean blues

Since the Industrial Revolution, Earth’s oceans have swallowed nearly half of all fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Damage could be reaching the tipping point.


September 1, 2006

Fighting the blues

Taking a page from Alcoholics Anonymous and similar groups, UW researchers successfully tested a brief, low-cost “intervention” to deal with depression.